Tag tv

at last, some excitement

Ewar Woowar – sorry, Edward Woodward – is joining the cast of ‘Stenders. But.. but.. this is Callan… the Equalizer

"On the surface, this is a warm, charming and engaging man but there are other much darker things going on." says the producer.

Oh, obviously. They’re all going to die in a hail of gunfire.

the good doctor

Right, let’s see if:

  • Russell T presses the Reset Button and it all turns out to be an alternate reality, timeline or dream or something
  • Donna Noble (Noble Lady?) turns out to be Timelordy and somehow sacrifices herself to become the next regeneration (while hopefully leaving it Tennant)
  • The Doctor’s Hand-in-a-Jar saves the day

Somehow I still think it’s going to be Tennant. As Lawrence Miles points out, Big Russ would never let "It’s starting!" be Tennant’s last words, and regenerations have traditionally always been different – this one’s so far identical to Ecclestone.

UPDATE: well, 2 and 3 pretty much, but some nice twists. Have to admit that Tennant does the ‘tragic figure doomed to travel space the time’ rather well, and Donna’s apotheosis and exit was well done. But Rose getting the cheap knockoff Doctor for her very own was a bit much, and for God’s sake don’t put Martha and Mickey in Torchwood. Please.

New TV…

Oooh, we’ve got a shiny new telly. It’s not very big, but it’s a massive improvement of the old one!

Batman!

That’s Catrin in absolute hysterics at her first ever viewing of the 60’s Batman TV series. Of course, it’s a part of my cultural upbringing, but I suppose to someone who’s never seen it before it must look like it’s from Mars. A very, very gay Mars.

dr who

Warren Ellis has seen the new Doctor Who, and has reviewed it. He’s a hard man to please, and he likes it.

It is, in fact, DOCTOR WHO, as it was, complete with fake jeopardy for the kids and laughs for the adults. It will probably disappoint old fans – and anyone looking for a BATTLESTAR GALACTICA-style treatment – because it resolutely refuses to take itself too seriously. It’s not afraid of doing gags like having a kid eaten by a marauding plastic rubbish bin because that’s all part of the ride, all part of the style. In Michael Moorcock’s phrase, it obeys and enjoys the genre.

And so you get that nice little counterpoint between strange comedy bits and straight dramatic moments that is the hallmark of a certain strain of British fiction. Showroom dummies (yes) coming to life and shooting people might look funny, and it is – but the bodies are just as dead. And that – the placing of an alien element into a naturalistic contemporary British context – is the signature of the old British sf style, from WAR OF THE WORLDS to DAY OF THE TRIFFIDS, from QUATERMASS AND THE PIT to, especially, DOCTOR WHO.

Definitely agree with that first paragraph – “taking itself too seriously” was the key mistake made by the Paul McGann abomination.

Oh, and read the next article, in which Warren talks about James Bond. Good stuff. Oh bugger – and the next article on Holmes.

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